Stonehenge

The Stonehenge Bluestones:

Following the 2008 Archaeological dig at Stonehenge, Prof’s. Darville and Wainright proposed that the site was once considered the ‘Neolithic Lourdes’. (3) In relation to this is one of the most intriguing aspects of Stonehenge, which is the question of the importance of now famous “Preseli Bluestones”, which were transported over 140 miles to the site from near Gors Fawr in Wales. The longstanding debate over the reason why stone was chosen from such a distance, when “sarsen” stone was locally available, appears to have been met with an answer in relation to this topic, as this particular stone has a longstanding association with both healing and sound. Bluestone – or a relatively high proportion of them (perhaps as much as ten percent) have the usually rare property of being “musical”. That is, they can ring like a bell or gong, or resound like a drum, when struck with a small hammer-stone, instead of the dull clunking sound rock-on-rock usually makes. That this property has been noted locally down the generations is shown by the “Maenclochogi” (“Ringing stones”) village place-name in the Preseli area’. (2) When we add this information to that provided by Geoffrey of Monmouth, who made a note in his history of Britain in 1215 AD that the ‘Medicinal power of the stones was stimulated by pouring water over them’. (10). We can be sure that the Bluestones have had a longstanding tradition for being used for curative purposes. It is noted that the oldest human remains found by Parker Pearson´s team date to around 3,030 B.C., at approximately the same time as the arrival of the first bluestones (Stonehenge II).

Article: Heritage Daily (Feb, 2012) ‘Stonehenge Design Based on Auditory Illusion’.    (I can´t find it)

Instead there is an interview with S. Waller: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2012/feb/16/stonehenge-based-magical-auditory-illusion

“If these people in the past were dancing in a circle around two pipers and were experiencing the loud and soft and loud and soft regions that happen when an interference pattern is set up, they would have felt there were these massive objects arranged in a ring. It would have been this completely baffling experience, and anything that was mysterious like that in the past was considered to be magic and supernatural. I think that was what motivated them to build the actual structure that matched this virtual impression. It was like a vision that they received from the other world. The design of Stonehenge matches this interference pattern auditory illusion.”

Steven Waller

In 2009, Rupert Till, a music expert at Huddersfield University, used a full-scale replica of Stonehenge and computer analyses to show that repetitive drum beats and chanting would have resonated loudly between the standing stones.

Timothy Darvill, professor of archaeology at Bournemouth University, said that while sound played an important role in events at Stonehenge, the monument was probably not designed with acoustics in mind.

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